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Stones

 

 

 

Archive 2 - Polished Stones

Jill Townsley-Stones-Arhive 1 Jill Townsley-Stones-0001 Jill Townsley-Stones-0061 Jill Townsley-Stones-0074 Jill Townsley-Stones-0100 Jill Townsley-Stones-archive 2 Jill Townsley-Stones-archive 2-2 Jill Townsley-Stones-archive 2-Opening2

Archive 3 - Stones

Jill Townsley-Stones-archive 3 Jill Townsley-Stones-archive 3-opening

Archive 1 - River Bottom Stones

Photogropher - Jamie Collier

polish_Panorama2

Stones consists of 3 archives presenting the same 100 stones. Each archive considers the way we classify objects, the logic of each classification and what that may say about the cultural position around the data presented in each archive.

Archive 3 – Sees the stones return to the ground. Sitting on a grey plinth under a Perspex cover. They are presented where they fall, but have new colourful coats that separate them from their original river bottom stone identity.

Stones (2015) was made for the exhibition 'Thought Positions in Sculpture' at Huddersfield Art Gallery and Curated by Rowan Bailey it was part of ROTA

The work is documented in the

Sculptural Thinking website: https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/st/thoughtpositionsinsculpture/jilltownsley/

For further details of the whole exhibition and research project, see: https://www.hud.ac.uk/research/researchcentres/st/thoughtpositionsinsculpture/

 

There is also a Documentary film – for the exhibition posted at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C3qB-SDxDgg

An interview with me discussing the work Stones can be found 29:46 mins into the documentary

This second archive is represented by 25 Perspex wall panels onto which is printed 4 stones each stone is painted from the bottle of nail varnish that sits on a shelf at the bottom of the panel. Each stone is now categorised by its colour and the name and number of the bottle of nail polish that painted it. Each shiny, brightly coloured stone now has a context within the urban, the city high street with its nail-bars and man made environment.

100 stones are taken from a river bed, each is numbered and measured, then re-presented in photographic form. Each stone is forensically photographed next to a yellow measuring tape. The tape measure offers a new hierarchy: the human ‘assumption’ of measurement and numbering (Mel Bochner 1969). Each photograph is printed on aluminium plate, forming a large photographic archive of the 100 images.

Medium: 100 dye sublimation prints on aluminium plate

Size: 78 x 350cm  

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Size: 50 x 475cm  

Medium: 24 Perspex panels with UV print and nail polish bottle

Medium: 100 Stones, Nail Polish

Size: 60cm high x  60  x 110cm